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Why does Tanzania hate Kenya?

Tanzania is ever more cold towards Kenya. This is the sole reason why the East African Community-EAC, remains mere rhetoric than tangible ...

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19/12/2014

What is the fee structure for private universities?

Private Universities differ in their fee structure, and also, depending on the course that one wants to study. However, as a general rule, the tuition fee is usually between Kshs.40,000 all the way up to Kshs.400,000 per academic year. Please check the individual university for the fee structure.

What is the main difference between private universities and public universities?

In private universities, the fee structure is uniform, and there are no regular or parallel students. This means that one will attend the same classes, and even do the same exams. Until recently, in public universities, regular and parallel degree students would sit in different classes and even sometimes do different exams. Also, in most private universities, accommodation for students is uniform. Due to their very nature, more affluent students tend to attend private universities and therefore, there communication skills may be top

Can I study for a bridging course in university?

Yes, you can study for a bridging course, and then enroll for a degree course. This is especially if you have scored less than a C or  a C+ in a particular subject which is considered important to the study of the said course. This will then allow you to enroll even in courses such as medicine or engineering.

Can I transfer and be a regular student after I have enrolled as a parallel student?

You can transfer from being a regular student to a parallel student, but not the other way round. If you want to become a regular student, you must have been selected by the central universities and colleges placement body.

What is the fee structure for parallel degree programs at JKUAT University?

The fee structure for parallel degree courses defer depending on the course, and the university which you will be attending. For instance, courses in medicine and related disciplines could be as high as Kshs.650,000 per academic year. Courses in engineering could cost about Kshs.250,000 to Kshs.300,000 per academic year, while courses in the sciences could cost Kshs.150,000 to Kshs.200,000 per academic year. The courses in the Arts disciplines may cost from Kshs.80,000 to Kshs.140,000 per academic year. For more information, you can check out the JKUAT website, and look out for press advertisements.

What is the fee structure for parallel degree courses at Moi University?

The fee structure for parallel degree courses defer depending on the course, and the university which you will be attending. For instance, courses in medicine and related disciplines could be as high as Kshs.650,000 per academic year. Courses in engineering could cost about Kshs.250,000 to Kshs.300,000 per academic year, while courses in the sciences could cost Kshs.150,000 to Kshs.200,000 per academic year. The courses in the Arts disciplines may cost from Kshs.80,000 to Kshs.140,000 per academic year. For more information, you can look up to the Moi University website, and for press advertisements.

What is the fee structure for parallel students at Kenyatta University?

The fee structure for parallel degree courses defer depending on the course, and the university which you will be attending. For instance, courses in medicine and related disciplines could be as high as Kshs.650,000 per academic year. Courses in engineering could cost about Kshs.250,000 to Kshs.300,000 per academic year, while courses in the sciences could cost Kshs.150,000 to Kshs.200,000 per academic year. The courses in the Arts disciplines may cost from Kshs.80,000 to Kshs.140,000 per academic year.

What is the fee structure at the University of Nairobi for Parallel students?

The fee structure for parallel degree courses at the University of Nairobi defers depending on the course which you will be enrolled for. For instance, courses in medicine and related disciplines could be as high as Kshs.650,000 per academic year. Courses in engineering could cost about Kshs.250,000 to Kshs.300,000 per academic year, while courses in the sciences could cost Kshs.150,000 to Kshs.200,000 per academic year. The courses in the Arts disciplines may cost from Kshs.80,000 to Kshs.140,000 per academic year. More information can be obtained from the university of Nairobi website and from press advertisements.

What is the fee structure for parallel degree courses in Kenya?

The fee structure for parallel degree courses in Kenya defers depending on the course, and the university which you will be attending. For instance, courses in medicine and related disciplines could be as high as Kshs.650,000 per academic year. Courses in engineering could cost about Kshs.250,000 to Kshs.300,000 per academic year, while courses in the sciences could cost Kshs.150,000 to Kshs.200,000 per academic year. The courses in the Arts disciplines may cost from Kshs.80,000 to Kshs.140,000 per academic year.

Which is better? Studying medicine in Kenya or abroad?

Studying medicine in Kenya has its advantages. For instance, you will be trained on diseases that encumber this country and continent, and so, when you go to practice, you will be acquainted with the medical situation in the country. In the developed countries, though you will be exposed to highly advanced facilities, the training may not necessarily provide you with the requisite techniques to work in poor and marginalized areas

Is engineering tough if you didn't pass Maths?

Engineering is heavily quantitative, and you would do well if you are good in Math and Physics. Almost all problems boil down to Math or Physics, and if one is not good in either or both of these subjects, then they will find the course very tough indeed.

Bteween Arts and Sciences- Which is more marketable?

It depends on where your strengths are. I would advise that you choose whether to pursue a course depending on which areas you are good at. In this way, you will do well and in the process, get good grades and be attractive to employers. While many people think that Arts courses are flooded, this is not necessarily the case, as you can see in newspaper job advertisements, most jobs are advertised by NGOs which require

Which is the best university for engineering courses?

The quality of engineering courses in Kenyan universities is nearly the same. What you have to ensure is that the relevant engineering course is registered by the engineering registration board, so that you don't run into problems when you'll be looking for work in future. Also, just to note, ensure that the university you attend has the requisite facilities so that you can train adequately as an engineer.

What is the most marketable course in Kenya?

There are many marketable courses in Kenya, and it will depend on how well you pass your course. So, the trick is to pass well in whatever course you have been admitted to, since for the first job at least, many employers want to see that you have good grades, since it signifies both brilliance, and hard work. That said however, a course like medicine still continues to be marketable regardless of the grades of a student.

What is the pass mark for each course in university?

The pass mark for each course is 40 percent. However, some universities use the grade point average- GPA- especially, the private universities. Some courses are however, pass or fail. The pass mark for medical courses is usually 50 percent. In most courses, a grade above 70 percent is an A, between 60 and 69 is a B, between 50 and 59 is a C, and between 40 and 49 is a D.

Are Parallel students treated better than regular students?

Initially, there were complains that parallel students were being treated better, but this has subsided, as students are now treated the same. In most cases, they sit the same exams, and are enrolled in the same courses, taught by the same lecturers. These days, most universities have merged both the regular and the parallel students. Public universities are obviously making strong efforts to attract the best and brightest

17/12/2014

Fees structure for Universities

The fees structure for universities vary depending on the course you are doing. However, generally, they are as follows:

Regular Students- Kshs.40,000- Kshs.60,000 per academic year. However, if recommendations by parliament are to be adopted, then the fees for regular studnets will be charged as per the unit cost of the course, which means that medical, science, and engineering students will have to pay more.

Parallel Students' fees depends on the course:

Arts and Science students pay on average Kshs. 80,000 to Kshs.120,000 per academic year. The fees for IT and engineering courses could be as high as Kshs250,000 per academic year. The fees for

15/12/2014

RE: Invest in a fast growing Eastern Africa Company

A fast growing high performing technology and office automation company with a high reputation for integrity, quality and excellence in products and service disbursement is seeking for an investment of $1,300,000 (KES 117,000,000) in exchange of 25% equity for its expansion drive in the Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Rwanda, Burundi, Ethiopia and South Sudan.

The 4 year old East African Nairobi based company offers sector disruptive products & services, high returns on investment, huge social impact, substantial customer value, significant amount of traction in our given market segment and a solid talented team. In four years of operation, annual sales have increased to well over $ 700,000.

Please review our offer and feel free to ask for any additional information or explanations. We can also arrange for a face to face or Skype meeting to discuss this investment opportunity in person.

We are targeting high net worth Individuals, Investment firms, Pension funds, Charity organizations, NGOs, Pension funds, both foreign and local in this offer.

Interested in this once in a lifetime opportunity, email us on kenyafund@gmail.com

Why invest in East Africa, the hottest frontier
Fifteen good reasons why you should choose East Africa as your investment destination:

• Market access to more than 150 million people
• Combined GDP size of about US$ 110 billion
• The world's fastest reforming region in terms of business regulation
• Simplified investment procedures and one stop center facility provided by national investment promotion agencies
• Generous incentives offered
• Vibrant and upcoming capital and securities market
• High level of intra-regional trade and cross-border investments
• Numerous investment opportunities traversing all sectors
• Abundant labour force – educated, trained, mobile, skilled and enterprising
• English is widely spoken; it is one of or the only official language in at least four of the five Partner States
• Insurance against non-commercial risk by Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency (MIGA) and Africa Trade Insurance Agency (ATIA)
• Sanctity of private property guaranteed by national constitutions
• Stable political environment and high level of governance and democracy
• Consumer loyalty
• A warm and hospitable people

The East African Community (EAC) is Africa's fastest growing trading bloc and the investment opportunities that exist across its five member states - Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda - are proving increasingly attractive to both the Diaspora and institutional investors alike.

African economies easily rank among the most resilient in the world. In the middle of the 2009 global economic recession, Africa was the only region apart from Asia that grew positively, at about 2%. The continent's growth has been on an upward trajectory ever since then- 4.5% in 2010 and 5.0% in 2011.


Africa is becoming an increasingly attractive hub for foreign investors in light of various economic, political and social reforms that are sweeping through the continent, resulting in a much improved business environment conducive for foreign direct investment.

Apart from that, there is widespread development of critical social and physical infrastructure, and there is an increasing pool of well-educated, English-speaking, enterprising workers in most countries across the continent.

There is also a significant boost in the spending power of Africans. According to the African Development Bank, Africa's fast-emerging middle class is now comprised of over 300 million people, and analysts from the McKinsey Global Institute estimated that general consumer spending across the continent will hover past the $1 trillion by 2013.

If you're a foreign investor who has yet to make a foray into Africa, now is the time to step in and capture a share of Africa's over $1 trillion opportunity in 2014.

Note: The company opts to remain unnamed in this email message. However, the identity and more information pertaining to the company can be revealed upon a written request. We assure all interested parties that the information shared between us will be treated with utmost confidentiality.
This private placement transaction is being conducted with the oversight, guidance and advice of a leading financial advisory firm, a certified accountants and auditors and a well-known legal advisory firm.
The ownership of the 25% stake will be split dictated by the amounts raised by investors.

I look forward to a mutually profitable relationship with you.
This is a rare opportunity to invest in growth and earn handsome returns.

Sincerely,
Chief executive Officer
Nairobi, Kenya



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12/12/2014

Looking for Financing for your business?

African start-ups must endeovor to create an ecosystem of talent, venture capital, intellectual property, and markets- @YALINetwork

Ideas for Wealth Generation

According to Peter Drucker, ideas, rather than physical goods will be the new wealth generators in the new knowledge economy.

Top Career Regrets.

According to Daniel Gulati, author of Passion and Purpose: Stories from the best and brightest young business leaders, the top career regrets for young professionals are:

1. I wish I hadn't taken the job for the money.

2. I wish I had quit my job earlier.

3. I wish I had the confidence to start my own business.